ADIOS, HUNTERS: The Reality Behind Animal Rights Radicals’ ‘Re-Wilding’ Wet Dream

Check out the anti-hunters’ detailed plan to extract hunters, anglers and trappers from the circle of life’s equation.

California –-(Ammoland.com)- There is an organized jihad being waged by radical environmental and animal rights activists against hunting, fishing, and trapping.  Some of this push is overt, while other efforts are subtle yet equally sinister.

These radical groups hope to substitute natural resource harvesting activities (such as hunting) by humans as the long-standing preferred method of wildlife management, and to instead adopt a new approach incorporating a theoretical but unrealistic natural predator-prey environmental balance.

In their fantasy this balance would be “naturally” self-regulating, would bring the eco-system into harmony, and would make hunting unnecessary.

This contrasting natural resource management model is commonly known as “conservation biology” or euphemistically “rewilding.”  The rewilding model rejects the traditional and centuries-old North American Model of Wildlife Management that intimately incorporates [low cost] consumptive-users (such as hunters) into the process of managing natural resources and wildlife.

It’s the radical environmentalists’ utopian “Circle of Life.” But without humans in the circle.

Proponents of the worldview that rejects the North American Model of Wildlife Management are cunning in their approach to getting their agenda adopted.  They start by advocating “conservation biology” to certain pre-disposed scientists, and they encourage those “scientists” to become activists of the approach rather than neutral observers and reporters.  These scientists-turned-activists then argue that the very human-designed natural conservation activities that have saved and preserved most wildlife species[1] should be tossed out and replaced with their view of a “natural ecological system” approach to wildlife management. Under their approach predators like coyotes, wolves, mountain lions, bears and mesopredators[2] are counted on to thrive in dramatically increased numbers by preying on deer, elk, moose, small game herds, and even on livestock.

Read more: Ammoland.com

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