Why Did The Cougar Cross The Road? To Keep From Inter-Breeding

By Gayne C. Young

It’s good to see California has priorities.

Secure the border?

Work on the economy?

Build a $10 million bridge for cats in Los Angeles?

Hell yeah!

Caltrans, the state agency responsible for highway, and bridge planning, construction, and maintenance, announced that it will spend $10 million on a bridge that will allow mountain lions and other wildlife to cross the 101 Freeway west of Los Angeles. The idea is that this project will keep animals from getting hit by vehicles and to keep the mountain lions from inter-breeding.

Caltrans’ director for Los Angeles and Ventura counties Carrie Bowen told CBSLA, “The new crossing will better integrate the environment and transportation systems, fostering better wildlife connectivity on either side of the 101 and increasing public safety by reducing the risk for collisions between vehicles and wildlife.”

Caltrans is seeking $2 million in federal aid to help pay for the project.

GayneandDogGayne C. Young is the author of the best selling books And Monkeys Threw Crap At Me: Adventures In Hunting, Fishing, And Writing and Teddy Roosevelt: Sasquatch Hunter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gayne C. Young

About the author, Gayne C. Young: Gayne C. Young is the author of the best selling books And Monkeys Threw Crap At Me: Adventures In Hunting, Fishing, And Writing and the editor of Texas Sporting Journal. In January 2011, he became the first American outdoor writer to interview Russian President, Vladimir Putin. Follow him on Facebook. View all articles by Gayne C. Young

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