TEXAS: Ranchers Round Up Illegals Destroying Their Ranches

It looks like some people are taking illegal immigration into their own hands. These ranchers are saying, ‘No mas’. Check it out…

Ronnie Osburn, wearing a cowboy hat and bulging brown belt, drives a white truck. A bumper sticker on the back reads, “F*** it, I should have died at the Alamo.”

Osburn’s business is cattle. His mission, though, is reporting and documenting illegal immigrants who trespass on his property.

For 34 years, he has managed the 12,500-acre Tepeguaje Ranch in Encino, where he lives alone.

Driving the length of the property takes 25 to 30 minutes. Osburn makes the drive often, looking for footprints as evidence of overnight or early morning activity.

A few weeks ago, he directed a group of 10 men from El Salvador, ages 19 to 23, to Border Patrol agents, who apprehended them. The men had shown a light outside a window of Osburn’s home, and asked to use the phone.

One wouldn’t know that this would be the end for the El Salvadorans, who smile boyishly for a photograph Osburn snaps of them. A boy wearing a beanie playfully sticks his tongue out for the photo. An older boy waves.

The photo lives in an album Osburn keeps in the truck. Other photos show dead bodies, skulls and bones, a bloodied toilet.

“I take photos so people know what happens here,” Osburn says.

He sleeps near a Beretta, precisely close enough so that he can reach for the gun in the dark. He keeps a loaded AR-15 assault rifle and a Ruger 380 in the truck, a comfort that does not stop him from persistently rubbing his fingers together.

Osburn can see only what’s in sight, and it’s hard for him not to wonder who or what lives deep into his property, in areas too thick with brush for his truck to navigate easily.

Read more: Daily Signal

 

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