HEY, PETA: Kendall Jones isn’t Backing Down From Hunting…Wants To Kill A Brown Bear

The young huntress speaks about instant fame, death threats and the next big animal on her young bucket list.

By Ben Phillipi, Guns.com

When 19-year-old Texas Tech student and cheerleader Kendall Jones posted photos of herself a few months ago posing with the animals she shot in Africa, she set the internet alight.

On one side, her critics accused her of glamorizing poaching, stating that she is seen posing with an endangered white rhino, of which only 20,000 remain. A petition circulated demanding she be banned from Africa. Some even called for her to be hunted down like the animals she targeted and there was even a Kill Kendall Jones Facebook page that popped up, which has since been taken down.

On the other side, avid hunters praised Kendall for standing up for what she believes and sticking to her guns. They applauded her courage and conservation and herald her as the queen of a new generation of young and increasingly female hunters.

All of this controversy helped Kendall and her best friend Taylor Altom to sign a deal with Remington for a reality TV show called Kendall Jones: Game On.

I wanted to find out if Kendall Jones was the coldhearted Lion King killer the anti-hunters made her out to be or if she was simply the target of discrimination because she’s a young pretty female who happens to love hunting.

I was lucky enough to meet up Kendall, Taylor and their business manager Justin Cook at Shot Show in Las Vegas.


 

SEE ALSO: MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY: Is Under Insane/Vicious Attacks For Hunting On His Own Ranch


 

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Get Doug Giles’ new book, Rise, Kill and Eat: A Theology of Hunting from Genesis to Revelation today!

Click here to get a signed copy

Click here to get an unsigned copy

 

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