BERLIN TERRORIST: New Details Released… Not Even His DAD Defends Him

Nobody — not even his DAD — is going to say ‘he was such a nice young man, nobody saw this coming’ …

German security services face difficult questions after it emerged that Amris, a lifelong criminal, should have been deported months ago.

The 23-year-old, who has a 100,000 euro reward on his head, was under close surveillance of German intelligence for several months following his arrival in the country last year.

He was arrested three times this year and his asylum application was rejected, but deportation papers were never served and he disappeared.

The Tunisian radical was known to be a supporter of Islamic State and to have received weapons training.

He tried to recruit an accomplice for a terror plot – which the authorities knew about – but still remained at large.

Today his own father claimed he had served four years in an Italian jail after he set fire to a school. Tunisian security officials also revealed he was convicted in absentia for aggravated theft with violence in his home country.

A senior foreign German politician today blamed the atrocity on ‘institutional political correctness’, arguing that Amri would not have been free to act if police had enforced the law.

Meanwhile a European arrest warrant issued for Amri reveals the fugitive has used at least six different aliases under three different nationalities. Photographs show how he has changed his appearance over the years.

Read more: Daily Mail

The son is so worthless that even when his dad talks to the media, it’s about his previous convictions.

Europe tried to deport him, but Tunisia (which collapsed with the ‘Arab Spring’) didn’t want him back.

Share if it’s wiser to keep bad men out than it is to eject them.

Like Clash? Like Clash.

Leave a Comment

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.