TOTAL BS: US Appeals Court Just Ruled AGAINST ‘Assault Rifles’

Exactly what part of ‘shall not be infringed’ don’t they understand?

The activist courts strike again.

Guess which ‘scary black rifle’ they’ve ruled against?

A US appeals court has ruled that military-style assault weapons are not protected under the US Constitution, dealing a blow to gun rights activists.
In a 10-4 ruling, the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, said the 45 assault weapons banned under Maryland’s law are not protected by the Second Amendment.
‘Put simply, we have no power to extend Second Amendment protection to the weapons of war,’ wrote Judge Robert King, adding that the Supreme Court’s decision in District of Columbia v. Heller explicitly excluded such coverage.

Maybe you’ve guessed by now.

If you live in Maryland, your Second Amendment Rights Officially do NOT extend to the AR-15, or others like it. (No, sissy, AR doesn’t stand for ‘assault rifle’. It’s the manufacturer. Google it.)

The dissenting judge let loose with a blistering critique:

Judge William Traxler issued a dissent, writing the decision ‘has gone to greater lengths than any other court to eviscerate the constitutionally guaranteed right to keep and bear arms.’
National Rifle Association spokeswoman Jennifer Baker said: ‘It is absurd to hold that the most popular rifle in America is not a protected ‘arm’ under the Second Amendment.’
She added that the majority opinion ‘clearly ignores the Supreme Court’s guidance from District of Columbia v. Heller that the Second Amendment protects arms that are ‘in common use at the time for lawful purposes like self-defense.’

We await their future rulings on the outlawing of pressure cookers.

Share if they’re missing the point of ‘shall not be infringed.’

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