‘Separation of Church and State’ Nonsense From Lying Secularists

Written by Matt Barber on July 30, 2013

We, the People of the State of California, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, in order to secure and perpetuate its blessings, do establish this Constitution.

Or New York?

We The People of the State of New York, grateful to Almighty God for our Freedom, in order to secure its blessings, DO ESTABLISH THIS CONSTITUTION.

You get the point. Based upon the unfounded assertions and fact-free yearnings of the ACLU and other liberal separatists, the state constitutions of all 50 states are, well, unconstitutional.

Silly, aren’t they?

But what about the U.S. Constitution? Doesn’t it at least require church-state separation?

No, not in the way “progressives” imagine it does. In fact, contrary to popular opinion, the words “separation of church and state” are found nowhere in the U.S. Constitution.

So why all the confusion?

It’s by design. The confusion has been intentionally fomented. It’s the byproduct of a decades-long religious cleansing campaign. The First Amendment’s Establishment Clause – a mere 10 words – is the primary tool the left misuses and abuses to accomplish its insurgency. Yet it remains abundantly clear in both scope and meaning. The Establishment Clause merely states: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion …”

That’s it.

Let’s break it down. What do you suppose the framers of the U.S. Constitution – a document specifically designed to limit the powers of federal government – intended with the word “Congress”? Did they mean state government, municipal government, your local school board or third-grade teacher?

Of course not. They meant exactly what they said: Congress – as in the United States Congress.

Now what did they mean by “… shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion”?

Well, in a letter to Benjamin Rush, a fellow-signer of the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson – often touted by the left as the great church-state separationist – answered this question. The First Amendment’s Establishment Clause was simply intended to restrict Congress from affirmatively “establishing,” through federal legislation, a national Christian denomination (similar to the Anglican Church of England).

As Jefferson put it: “[T]he clause of the Constitution” covering “freedom of religion” was intended to necessarily preclude “an establishment of a particular form of Christianity through the United States.”

The individual states, however, faced no such restriction.

In fact, until as late as1877 – and after religious free exercise became absolute with passage of the Fourteenth Amendment – most states did have an official state form of Christianity. Massachusetts, for example, sanctioned the Congregational Church until 1833.

Then religious tolerance was unchained in the Bay State: “[A]ll religious sects and denominations, demeaning themselves peaceably, and as good citizens of the commonwealth, shall be equally under the protection of the law; and no subordination of any one sect or denomination to another shall ever be established by law.”

That is, quite simply, what church-state separation entails. The state must not “prohibit the free exercise” of any religion by “establishing a particular form of Christianity” or through imposing a religious litmus test to hold public office.

In short, the ACLU and other like-minded “progressives” are liars.

Carry on.

Image: Drácula (1931) aka Spanish Dracula; Carlos Villarías as Dracula

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Matt Barber is founder and editor-in-chief of BarbWire.com and an attorney concentrating in constitutional law. In addition to his law degree, Matt holds a Master of Arts in Public Policy from Regent University. Matt is both an author and a popular columnist. He’s known for a unique writing style (an entertaining blend of thoughtful analysis and Swiftian satire, delivered with a rapier wit). Many newspapers and online publications run Matt’s columns, to include WND, TheBlaze, the Washington Times, TownHall and many more. Author of the book, “The Right Hook: From the Ring to the Culture War,” Matt is currently penning his first novel. In addition to frequent public speaking engagements, Matt has appeared as a cultural analyst on the Fox News Channel, MSNBC and CNN and is a regular guest on dozens of talk radio programs and networks including Michael Savage, the G. Gordon Liddy Show, Dennis Prager, the Michael Medved Show, the Janet Mefferd Show and others. Matt also co-hosts “Faith and Freedom” a daily legal and cultural issues talk radio program heard on about 90 stations across the country. Matt served twelve years in the Army National Guard, was a law enforcement officer for three years and a corporate fraud investigator for five years. Setting him apart from others in his various fields, Matt was an undefeated heavyweight professional boxer retiring in 2004. Prior to turning pro, he was a several time state and regional Golden Gloves champion, competing in the 1992 Western Olympic Trials and winning a Gold Medal in the 1993 Police and Fire World Games.