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Enough! Go Ahead and Call Me a Racist

Chris Matthews has always been a shinning example of a liberal suffering from a huge case of white guilt. What is white guilt? It’s simple really, Matthews and those like him experience a feeling or a thought that tells them that just by their heritage and ethnicity alone they are guilty of racial bigotry and must apologize for it.

Matthews was on his network, MSNLSD, and was asking when the white conservative will accept Barack Obama. Well Chris, it’s like this. I have no racial issue with Barack Obama. I think he by all accounts is a good father and a model citizen, except for his far left socialist views and his ready acceptance of gay marriage and infanticide, of course. I will never agree with Obama no matter how much you call me a racist and insinuate that the only reason I disagree with the President is because he is black.

Matthews then went on to say that white conservatives never wanted a black man in office. Hey Chris, just for the record I would vote for Allen West, Clarence Thomas and Tim Scott tomorrow. Since we are talking about Tim Scott, how in the world did the ethnically sensitive left forget to invite Tim Scott, the only black senator, to the King rally?

After watching quite a bit of the King March yesterday I found myself being quite disgusted at where we are at as a country. I reject this assertion that somehow we haven’t come far enough on the issue of civil rights. I heard this mantra all day yesterday, “We have made progress, but we still have a long way to go.” What the hell does that even mean?

Before I listened to Chris Matthews trumpet his moronic statements I heard Martin Luther King III give a short speech. The speech itself wasn’t so bad except for the fact that, not once but twice, the man talks about how much farther we have to go in the fight for civil rights.

My question is simple. Where is the finish line? Seriously, it takes some serious balls to stand next to the first black President of the United States and pretend that all things are not equal. In fact, in the age of Affirmative Action and the EEOC many have claimed that the scale is tipping the other way all together. In this time when you get college scholarships based off nothing but the color of your skin, I ask where is the finish line?

To paraphrase from the late, great Booker T. Washington, there was and still is a class of “Negroes” who are seeking to profit and get rich off the struggles of the black community. I venture to say that in this time in America the problems in the black community are their own. No longer is it the evil bigoted white man that terrorizes their communities, it is their own children. Just this past week, MLK III wrote a column in which he elaborated on how the dream hasn’t been realized. In this column he mention two issues that I want to hit on to close out my column this week. The first is Trayvon Martin and the second is voter ID laws.

In his column MLK III likened Martin to the infamous Emmett Till. He is not the first to use this ridiculous analogy, but hopefully he will be the last. I quite frankly am sick of hearing about Trayvon and his racial injustice. There was none, just accept it. The FBI went looking for a race angle and never found it.

You know where there is a race angle, though? How about the murder of Chris Lane? Lane was a white college student from Australia who was targeted by black teenagers, one of whom professed to hate whites. He was shot in the back and left to bleed out like an animal on the side of the road.

Another victim by the name of Delbert “Shorty” Belton, was killed this past week as well. Belton was an eighty-eight year old World War Two veteran who was beaten to death by two black teenagers with flashlights.

Finally, just the other day, I saw another story of a hotdog vendor being savagely beaten in the head with a hammer by four black males in front of a Home Depot. All white victims and all black suspects; doesn’t that qualify as racial violence? Why didn’t MLK III mention them in his column about how far we need to go? Until we are ready to have a truly open and honest discussion about the collapse of the black family structure and how it is causing deaths of all races, I’m done hearing about Trayvon Martin.

Last but not least, MLK III talks about voter ID laws and how they are targeting the black community. Well, in short, this is nothing more than a straw man argument. If that is the case are cigarette and beer sales also targeting the black community or how about banks when they go to cash a check? Your ID is used for just that, IDENTIFICATION. If I have to show an ID to exercise my second amendment rights then I have no problem with you having to show an ID to exercise your voting rights.

These laws are not racist, anymore than I am racist for challenging the statements of a race-monger who is content to make money off of “civil rights.” You know what Dr. King really wanted? He wanted a world where everyman was judged by his character and his actions. Instead, these people who invoke his name judge everyman by his race and justify his character by the very same measure. If you want to see where we have a long way to go, you can start by examining those who claim to be the closest to the late Dr. King.

Image: Ardfern; Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Mark Mayberry

About the author, Mark Mayberry:

Mark Mayberry lives in Tennessee and is pursuing a Law Degree. He hopes to work in politics and law after graduating. He is also a staff writer at TruthAboutBills.org and is the operator of http://www.guerrilla-politics.com. Mark is an avid outdoorsman and enjoys spending time hunting and fishing as well as with his family. You can reach Mark on Facebook and Twitter as well as his website http://www.guerrilla-politics.com.

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