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Exasperating: Today’s Leaders Offer Résumés Padded with Nothingness

By Deborah Elmar
Clash Daily Guest Contributor

Our leadership class’s real accomplishment is résumé padding.” – Mark Steyn
 
In these declining years of America, the people who should be our leaders are not our leaders.
 
George Washington was a soldier and a gentleman farmer.

Abraham Lincoln worked at different jobs involving hard physical labor.

Rutherford B. Hayes was a soldier and a governor.

Harry Truman was a farmer, a soldier and a small business owner.
 
But now our leaders are lawyers, paper-pushers, desk jockeys and members of the permanent political class. Many of them have never operated a hands-on business. Many of them never held leadership positions that require actual leadership (e.g.: governor of a state). They were handed positions by people who were aiming them at other goals, so they performed  these manufactured, résumé-padding jobs, consisting of committees to manage transitions to more committees, with their eyes always on the prize at the end instead of focusing on the work at hand. Peons below them were usually available to do any actual work required.
 
Our present and future elites and leaders make sure they attend the right Ivy League universities, make the right acquaintances, and intermarry. The average life of the average American is alien to them.
 
These new members of the elite are not producing anything of value. They merely rotate around each other and consume resources (tax-dollars) extracted from the rest of us. The money always comes from somewhere, after all. They shore up their voter base at our expense. They can’t manage foreign affairs, or a war, without throwing away billions of dollars and thousands of lives. They can’t set up and operate a functioning website  and government program, despite billions of dollars thrown at it all. They can’t perform the practical tasks of maintaining a civilized society without messing up and making the rest of us pay for their errors.
 
The corridors of power have become one grand cycle of nothingness and emptiness that benefits the nation very little but provides huge salaries for those walking the circle’s path. George Washington “returned to his farm” when his task of leadership was done. Today many of our elites in both political  parties would never even think of leaving the Washington corridor. They circulate, maneuver, hang onto their positions, enjoy the perks and drain the rest of us while adding to our burdens with endless, bureaucratic, intimidating, business-ruining regulations created by government employees who will always ensure the growth of their own tax-funded class at great cost to actual productivity.
 
America will not survive this top-heavy reign of non-producers, these elitists with empty résumés. They are the new Aristocracy and we can’t afford them.
 
What do average citizens need, once we have God, family and the freedom to live our lives as we deem fit? We need food, shelter, clothing, health, national security, physical safety, law and order, good roads, transportation, warmth in winter, electricity, etc. Who builds, invents, manufactures, organizes and delivers those needs to us? Farmers, fishermen, cargo-ship captains and crews, truck-drivers, factory-owners and managers, business-owners, soldiers, police, doctors and nurses, construction and road-crew members, oil-field crews: these hard-working Americans provide us what we need.
 
I respectfully submit that many of those blue-collar/middle-class, hard-working people I mentioned above could be plucked out of their honest obscurity, placed in the Oval Office, and do a better job at the practical tasks of managing the country than the pack of empty résumé-holders that presently occupy the American people’s White House. Those unknowns work at real jobs that produce something of value. They know what it is to have to labor for their bread, to have to prove themselves worthy of a position instead of having it handed to them on a platter, to keep a business both profitable and honest. They have tried to live within their means. They would look at the dollar figures on a federal budget that runs in the billions and they would understand that every tax-dollar was extracted from the sweat of another man’s brow, and should be used with respect. They would understand that lives are involved when weighty decisions are made.
 
But the people who should be our leaders are not our leaders.  Their priorities are not worldly power or fame and they are not possessed with a misguided, self-righteous and dangerous sense of do-gooder Utopian-ism. Their priorities are: God, family, a good life with loved ones. John Adams warned that the country would not survive if the population lost morality; we see the effects today when the immoral are elected to the top ranks while the good guys hunker down and hope to ride it out. But can we ride it out, or will we only ride it down? The nation may keep the name “The United States of America” in the next few decades, but it will no longer be the America where a man once could live free to fulfill his destiny. The sweat of our brows will go to the consumers of all and producers of nothing, and we will be their serfs.
 
Aristocrats come in many faces, guises, and ideologies, but in the end, they’re all the same: a few elites on the top whose only real skills lie in their abilities to be cutthroats in the circular nothingness of the corridors of power and to cover up their scandals; all of them being fed by the rest of us, while we, the productive ones, are denied the fruits of our own labor.
 
America, they’re baaa-ack.

deb elmar imageDeborah Elmar is a Christian, wife and mother. She blogs at Collecting Quotes and occasionally posts at Return of Queens. She is a Canadian who lives with her family in America and loves both countries.

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