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ZOO JEANS: Jeans Ripped Apart By Caged Animals Auctioned Off for Animal Rights Group

By Gayne C. Young
Clash Daily Guest Contributor

In a move of sheer genius, a Tokyo zoo has decided to support an animal rights group by exploiting caged animals.

“Zoo Jeans” are jeans that have been distressed – errr, ripped apart – by lions, tigers, and bears confined to small spaces in the Kamine Zoo.

Zoo Director Nobutaka Namae explained the process to Agence France-Presse. “We wrapped several pieces of denim around tires and other toys. Once they were thrown into the enclosures, the animals jumped on them,” Namae said. “The denim was actually much tougher than we had thought, and it turned out nicely destroyed.”

The jeans will be auctioned to the highest bidder with the proceeds being donated to the World Wildlife Fund.

A pair ripped by a caged tiger had reached $1,200 as of closing Monday.

This story gives me hope for my planned line of platypus mauled yoga pants!

 

GayneandDogGayne C. Young is the author of the best selling books And Monkeys Threw Crap At Me: Adventures In Hunting, Fishing, And Writing and The Complete Guide To Hunting Wild Boar and Javelina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Get Doug Giles’ new book, Rise, Kill and Eat: A Theology of Hunting from Genesis to Revelation today!

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Gayne C. Young

About the author, Gayne C. Young: Gayne C. Young is the author of the best selling books And Monkeys Threw Crap At Me: Adventures In Hunting, Fishing, And Writing and the editor of Texas Sporting Journal. In January 2011, he became the first American outdoor writer to interview Russian President, Vladimir Putin. Follow him on Facebook. View all articles by Gayne C. Young

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