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JUST DIG A HOLE AND THROW ME IN: The Resurrection Of Green Burials

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By Ellen McCarthy

Jay Castaño knows exactly what his funeral will be like.

A few days after he dies, friends and family will gather in Southeast Washington, say a few kind words and put his unembalmed body straight into the Earth.

“I want to be wrapped in a shroud like a little burrito,” says Castaño, a credentialing officer at a D.C. public charter school. “They can call it a Chipotle funeral. They can wrap me up and throw me there and cover me up with some grass and soil.”

He doesn’t even have a particular preference for the shroud. “It could be a bedsheet,” he says, “as long as it’s clean and nice.”

For the record, Castaño has no plans to die anytime soon. But the 65-year-old has written in his last will and testament that whenever he does pass, he intends to become part of the “green burial” movement — a push to strip away the trappings of the modern funeral industry and get back to basics. Dust to dust and all that jazz.

“I want to be part of a tree, be part of a flower — go back to being part of the Earth,” he says.

Also: “I am a tightwad.” Those fancy caskets don’t come cheap.

Read more: Washington Post

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