Show

BECAUSE THEY CAN! Why We Must Not Elect Hillary (and Bill) Clinton (Again)

The real problem with Hillary’s emails isn’t the emails themselves. It’s that this episode has proven beyond doubt that the Clinton machine has never changed, and never will. It will always operate on the principle Bill Clinton articulated in interviews while selling his almost unreadable book, which was in small part about Monica Lewinsky. Addressing why he did what he did, he said simply: “Because I could.”

Back then, he was trying to make us (including the gullible Oprah Winfrey and the even more gullible Dan Rather) believe he thought he had done wrong and was sorry, but the fact is that “because I could” is the reason the Clintons do anything. There is, in the Clinton household, a distinct entitlement mindset that makes them believe petty things like laws don’t apply to them, and that, if they can get away with breaking them, they should.

The Clintons do things—unethical things, illegal things, deceitful things—because they know they can get away with them. Bill has affairs. Hillary lies. They take foreign money for their foundation, knowing how it will look, knowing that if a Republican Secretary of State was taking money from foreign governments, the media and the Democrats couldn’t gather the impeachment team fast enough.

But the Clintons keep doing what they want—because they can.

According to Hillary Clinton, the reason she used her private email account, on her private server, which was inside her house, was mere “convenience.” She tells us that she didn’t want to have to carry two Blackberry devices, and just thought it made sense. Perhaps it would have been better not to have done that, but she did, and now she’s gone through all the emails and picked out the ones that were the businessy ones and handed them over (and deleted the rest). So we can all just calm down and let her get on with the business of being inevitable.

Respectfully, Madam Secretary, that’s ridiculous.

First of all, being the Secretary of State isn’t like being a suburban housewife who sells cosmetics or candles for a little spending money and doesn’t really need to separate her business and her personal life all that much. Being Secretary of State means there should be things you don’t share with anyone—even your ex-president husband. It means your emails should have the highest possible level of security. It means you don’t get to mix business and personal, and it means we have every reason to believe that the only reason to use a private email address for company business is so that people looking into your business business won’t get to see the things you don’t want them to see, because you hid them in your personal bidness.

And that’s none of anyone’s beeswax, right? So no one’s going to look there. Least of all the mainstream media.

As a Clinton, she believes she will get away with it, so she will do it.

Because she can.

And if (please, no), the American voter is foolish enough, or apathetic enough, or duped enough—or whatever it would take for such an injustice to take place in this country again—to return the Clintons to the White House, they will be proven right.

Letting them back in the White House, knowing what they did the last time they were in there, would be like charging O.J. Simpson with simple assault instead of sending him to prison for armed robbery. It would be a reward for decades of bad behavior, a wink at what we know without doubt would ensue.

Please, America. Think it through.

Remember how we had to deal with Bill’s unconscionable lies even before he was elected—when his team first employed the “nuts and sluts” defense? Remember Gennifer Flowers? Remember that Hillary knew all about all of it. REMEMBER.

Remember the long nightmare of Whitewater? Remember Jim McDougall? Remember Vince Foster’s suicide? Remember how the Clintons fired the staff of the White House travel office in order to put their own friends in charge of it? The final report of the Independent Counsel on that matter said that Hillary was the one who made factually false statements about the incident. She got away with it. REMEMBER.

And this is not Hillary’s first adventure in misfiling and suspect record-keeping.

Remember the billing records for the Rose Law Firm, where Hillary used to work? Congress subpoenaed them in 1994, but they were “missing” until 1996—when they turned up mysteriously in a box of stuff that had been mistakenly moved out of the private quarters of the First Family and into another White House office. In 1994, Hillary also claimed to know nothing about the shredding or disposal of any Whitewater documents. Then, in 1996, under oath, she admitted that she cooperated in that process. But it was all just silly mix-ups with files, and what difference did it make? (No, she didn’t say that. It would be another sixteen years before she thought that one up.)

And then there was that little dustup about a video-caused disaster–but no one will remember that by 2016, right? I mean, gosh, that would be so, like, four years ago by then!

Hillary thinks she is entitled to run, and entitled to win. And she will do anything to make it so. Because she thinks she can.

Please, America. Prove her wrong. REMEMBER.

Image: http://laughingconservative.blogspot.com/2011/09/bill-laughs-off-hillary-challenge-to_18.html

image

Dr. Mom

About the author, Dr. Mom: Dr. Mom is a married mother of three boys and the author of Souls, Bodies, Spirits: The Drive to Abolish Abortion Since 1973. The hills she chooses to die on are the Bible and the Constitution, in that order. In addition to her American Studies doctorate, she also holds a Master’s degree in Forensic Psychology and is, therefore, perfectly equipped to interpret the current Administration. She also tweets as DrKC4. View all articles by Dr. Mom

Like Clash? Like Clash.

Leave a Comment

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.