Hunter LEGALLY Kills ‘Spitfire’ The Wolf – Tree Humpers Call For Wolf Hunting BAN

Written by Wes Walker on December 3, 2018

It never fails, give an animal a name, and people freak out if it dies.

If only we saw such levels of outrage about the rising body count in — say — Chicago or Baltimore. Maybe some lives in our inner-cities might be saved.

If only THOSE victims had names.

Nah, it’s more ‘woke’ to hate on hunters for shooting a wolf.

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As we said, they gave the wolf a name. (In this case, ‘Spitfire’.) Not a bad name, as wolf names go, but as soon as the animal has a name, the psycho wing of the animal rights crowd suddenly treat it like a relative.

No thought is given to why a predator may need to or even be lawfully permitted be culled. No thought to what OTHER ‘adorable animals’ might be on its regular menu, bleeding the ground red on a regular basis… whether wild ones or a farmer’s domestic animals.

None of that matters now that Spitfire has a name, and was shot by one of those EEEEEVIL hunter people.

It’s no different from the outrage we once saw over ‘Harumbe’ (remember THAT internet nightmare?) or ‘Cecil’ the Lion. Forget the fact that ‘Spitfire’ and ‘Cecil’ were lawfully hunted with the approval of game management authorities, and Harumbe was a threat to a toddler.

None of that matters. Nature has been transformed in the imaginations of these people into some sort of bizarro Disney fairy tale where Lions and warthogs can be buddies, or a wolf can raise a child in the Indian Jungle.

Sorry to crush the fantasy, but in that story, it would just as likely have devoured the child.

The shooting occurred near cabins and was within hunting laws; Montana has permitted hunting of wolves since 2011, and a few hundred are killed each year.

“A game warden checked with the hunter and everything about this harvest was legal,” said Abby Nelson, a wolf management specialist with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

Wolves were restored to the park in the 1990s and quickly grew in number. About 100 wolves belong to 10 packs in Yellowstone, which is considered the ideal park for sightings of the animals as they hunt elk, feed on carcasses and play with their pups. Some 1,700 wolves live in the Northern Rocky Mountain states of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming.
Source: NYTimes

The Times article goes on about the wolf’s ‘famous mother’ and the ‘daughter she leaves behind’.

It’s a freaking obituary. For a wolf.

A wolf that was very near the homes of actual people. Give your head a shake, people.

Just because a wolf has a ‘famous name’ doesn’t shield it from real life consequences. (That privilege only extends to the Clintons and other wealthy and powerful figures.)

Get Doug Giles’ book, Rise, Kill and Eat: A Theology of Hunting from Genesis to Revelation today!

 
If a person looked to Scripture and paid particular attention to the passages within the Bible that address the topic of hunting, then they’d walk away thinking not only is hunting animals tolerated but it is endorsed by God. And that’s exactly what this little book is about: proving that God, from Genesis to Revelation, is extremely cool with hunters and hunting. I’ll go out on a biblical limb and claim right off the bat that you cannot show me, through the balance of the Bible, that the God of the Scripture is against the responsible killing and the grilling of the animals He created. ~Doug Giles
 
In his killer new book RISE, KILL & EAT: A Theology of Hunting From Genesis to Revelation Doug carries on with his courageous war against the lunatic fringe who dare recommend Bambi solutions to the annual production of edible wildlife. –Ted Nugent

 

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