HONG KONG: Trump Signs HK Human Rights Bill Into Law … Your Move, China

Written by Wes Walker on November 28, 2019

They laughed when Trump made China a central plank in his 2016 platform. Nobody’s laughing now.

When the rest of the world was tripping over themselves to kiss the backside of the Chinese dictator, Trump was going the other direction.

Oh sure, Trump may have caught flack for being too soft on the leader as a PERSON, by not attacking him personally the way he would throw elbows at his domestic political opponents, but his policies played hardball.

Tariffs were slapped in place.

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Ultimatums were given.

Trump is making several specific demands, including demands about intellectual property for which China has had exactly ZERO respect in past years.

As a result of Trump playing hardball, China is now smack in the middle of a 30-year financial low.

And now, with China throwing their weight around in Hong Kong, Trump and both sides of the House and Senate are showing a rare moment of bipartisanship.

This bill addresses Hong Kong’s status under U.S. law and imposes sanctions on those responsible for human rights violations in Hong Kong. (Hong Kong is part of China but has a largely separate legal and economic system.)

The Department of State shall certify annually to Congress as to whether Hong Kong warrants its unique treatment under various treaties, agreements, and U.S. law. The analysis shall evaluate whether Hong Kong is upholding the rule of law and protecting rights enumerated in various documents, including (1) the agreement between the United Kingdom and China regarding Hong Kong’s return to China, and (2) the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The bill extends existing annual reporting requirements on matters of U.S. interest in Hong Kong through 2027 and expands such reports to include assessments of (1) limits to Hong Kong’s autonomy, either self-imposed or due to China’s actions; and (2) whether rescission of Hong Kong’s special treatment would further erode Hong Kong’s autonomy.

The President shall annually report to Congress on Hong Kong’s enforcement of U.S. export controls, including whether items of U.S. origin have been used for mass surveillance in China and whether Hong Kong has been used to evade sanctions on North Korea or Iran.

The State Department shall notify Congress if any proposed or enacted law in Hong Kong negatively impacts U.S. interests, including by putting U.S. citizens at risk of rendition to China.

The President shall impose property and visa-blocking sanctions on foreign persons responsible for gross human rights violations in Hong Kong.
Source: Congress

China, predictably, was pretty pissed off.

China on Thursday demanded President Donald Trump veto legislation aimed at supporting human rights in Hong Kong and renewed a threat to take “strong countermeasures” if the bills become law.

Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act undermined both China’s interests and those of the U.S. in the semi-autonomous Chinese city.

“We urge the U.S. to grasp the situation, stop its wrongdoing before it’s too late, prevent this act from becoming law (and) immediately stop interfering in Hong Kong affairs and China’s internal affairs,” Geng said at a daily news briefing.

“If the U.S. continues to make the wrong moves, China will be taking strong countermeasures for sure,” Geng said.
Source: Time

Sorry, Pooh-bear, you don’t get to tell Americans which laws we can or cannot pass.

Respect Hong Kong’s semi-autonomous status and the human rights of their citizens and there is no issue… right?

And that’s exactly WHY they hate this in Beijing.

In HONG KONG, however it’s a whole other story:

Let’s see our PartisanPress ask the citizen of Hong Kong whether they agree with the Democrat premise that Trump is a ‘friend of dictators’.

If those red-white-and-blue flags are any indication, that’ll be a solid ‘no’.

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