Freedom of Religion? Sure — But Not for Murder and Mutilation

Written by William Pauwels on July 2, 2013

Flag_of_Jamiat-e_Islami.svgThe Constitutional Protection of Religion – the Freedom of Religion – Assumes That All Religions Stand for the Basic Values Enumerated in the USA Constitution.

See this video for a startling, short report on the Muslim me

nace in the UK.  Will this happen in the USA?  After seeing the video, please read my commentary below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KtJKNgO_ys

The Constitutional protection of religion – the freedom of religion – assumes that all religions stand for the basic values enumerated in the USA Constitution.

Our Founders never imagined that a religion would encourage the killing and/or mutilation of its nonbelievers. But Islam advocates just that.

I understand many of our politicians claim that only radical Muslims endorse killing and mutilation. Yet even moderate Muslims look the other way and/or refuse to condemn their violent brothers.

It’s naïve and imprudent to extend freedom of religion to Muslims when their primary document – the Koran – advocates killing and mutilation of people of other faiths.

Clearly, a constitutional amendment is needed to assure freedom of nonviolent, peaceful and tolerant religions.  Islam’s commitment to radical, first-millennium violence disqualifies it from Constitutional protection.

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William Pauwels
William A. Pauwels, Sr. was born in Jackson Michigan to a Belgian, immigrant, entrepreneurial family. Bill is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and served in executive and/or leadership positions at Thomson Industries, Inc., Dow Corning, Loctite and Sherwin-Williams. He is currently CIO of Pauwels Private Investment Practice. He's been commenting on matters political/economic/philosophical since 1980.