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LMAO: McDonald’s Uses Classical Music To Control Drunk Customers – Here’s The Results

Want a Big Mac after a night on the town? You might get treated to ‘Big Bach’ as well…

After ‘Last Call’ some folks just aren’t ready to go home, so they head over to the ubiquitous 24-hour Mc D’s restaurant for a bite to eat.

Unfortunately for the McDonald’s staff, sometimes this means confrontations between drunken customers that can become full-on brawls.

Some McDonald’s restaurants in the United Kingdom have been trying a new tactic to battle the would-be battles.

However, the fast food restaurant has found a clever trick to prevent trouble – and keep any late night antics at bay.

If you stroll into a McDonald’s on Cheltenham high street in Gloucester or Liverpool city centre after a session down the pub, you’ll hear classical music playing to encourage ‘more acceptable behaviour’.

Have a listen:

The results seem to be positive.

The chain has tested the effects of classical music in the past and played it inside some of their restaurants – finding that it has a ‘calming affect’…

….A McDonald’s spokesperson said: “We have tested the effects of classical music in the past and played it in some of our restaurants as it encourages more acceptable behaviour. Typically, classical music is played from early evening onwards, and in some cases, on certain nights in a small number of restaurants.”
Source: The Mirror UK

If the results continue to be positive, it might just spread across the pond to North America.

Kudos to McDonald’s that is concerned about the safety of their staff and their customers.

What do you think of this pre-emptive strike against possible aggressive behavior?

Let us know in the comments.

Share if you would welcome this at the McDonald’s restaurants in the U.S. if it actually works

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