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Harvey’s Heroes & Zeroes: Here’s The Difference Between Texas Bad@sses And Entitled Looting Scumbags

Disasters like Hurrican Harvey devastate lives. Some do whatever they can to survive, but there are others that see things big picture. Here are some of those people.

The heroes.

Feminists rail against ‘toxic masculinity’, but it’s that very masculine drive to be strong and protect that has made such a difference in the aftermath of this natural disaster.

Thank God for all of the ‘toxic masculinity’ on display in Texas right now!

One particular image has become the iconic image of heroism on display in Houston after the devastation of Hurricane Harvey.

But there are so many other heroes in Texas.

Here are a few.

Watch:

Remember what happened post-Katrina in New Orleans:

Unfortunately, the same thing happened with Hurricane Harvey:

And there were more instances looting and a ridiculous number of people attempting to price gouge — which is illegal:

And to restore your faith in humanity, watch a group of teens as they rescue as many people as they can.

Seventeen-year-old Thomas Edwards and his three friends, Richard Dickason, 17, Liam Connor, 17, and his brother Declan Connor, 15, were some of those heroes. The boys, all high school students at Strake Jesuit College Preparatory in Houston, spent hours rescuing stranded Texans in a small fishing boat. Edwards estimates the crew saved over 50 people, not to mention numerous pets.

These guys were even rescuing bunnies:

The boys began working in collaboration with local firefighters, police officers, and rescue workers, saving at least 50 people, said Edwards. “Neighbors would tell us addresses or point in directions to where they heard people yelling from,” he recalled.

“We rescued families, babies, dogs, rabbits, you name it,” explained the 17-year-old. “My friend Liam and I would stay on the paddle board and pull the boat across the intersection in order to unload people closer to the Kroger parking lot. It was an incredibly surreal experience to take a boat down streets while trying to dodge sunken cars and overhanging tree limbs.”

That’s what we’re talking about.

That is real heroism.

And these are teens.

It makes me feel hope for the future.

And I’m not alone.

“People were calling us patriots, fine young men, and heroes,” he said. “All of these comments bolstered our morale and let us know that what we were doing did not go without recognition, although we would have done so regardless.

One comment really resonated with Edwards: “Someone said that in times like these, differences don’t matter because we are all in the same predicament.”
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Great job, Thomas, Richard, Liam, and Declan.

You guys are real heroes.

We need more young men and women like these teens.

These kids helped anyone that they saw in need, regardless of color, ethnicity, or religion. They saw people as people and did what they could to help.

This is truly what Makes America Great — uniting to help our neighbors in desperate times.

Identity politics is a just a way to divide us and keep us segregated.

Maybe we can stop with the ginning up of differences on race and just unite as Americans.

And act on those American values like these young men did.

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 Effeminization Of The American Male

by Doug Giles

Doug Giles, best-selling author of Raising Righteous And Rowdy Girls and Editor-In-Chief of the mega-blog, ClashDaily.com, has just penned a book he guarantees will kick hipster males into the rarefied air of masculinity. That is, if the man-child will put down his frappuccino; shut the hell up and listen and obey everything he instructs them to do in his timely and tornadic tome. Buy Now:The Effeminization Of The American Male

Share if these heroic stories have restored your faith in humanity — and especially in the younger generation

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