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Four Things That Donald Trump and Martin Luther Have In Common

October 31st marked “Reformation Day” and the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of his “95 Theses” on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany. Moreover, I am currently reading Eric Metaxas’ newest release: Martin Luther: The Man Who Rediscovered God and Changed the World.

So lately, Martin Luther has been on my mind.

Believe it or not, it has occurred to me that Martin Luther and President Trump share some important traits:

Luther took advantage of the recently invented printing press to get his messages out to the public. Donald Trump is taking advantage of the recently invented Twitter to get his message out.

Luther wrote in contemporary German, which ordinary folks could understand. The President writes in contemporary English, which ordinary folks can understand.

The controversial religious leader sought to revolutionize self-serving Catholic practices. Trump seeks to revolutionize the self-serving practices of America’s federal government.

Both Luther and Trump have wisely used the KISS PRINCIPLE: Keep it short and simple.

photo credit: Excerpted from: Roy’s World Translating the Bible in the year 1532 via photopin (license)

Share if you agree these two big religious figures have some important things in common.

William Pauwels

About the author, William Pauwels: William A. Pauwels, Sr. was born in Jackson Michigan to a Belgian, immigrant, entrepreneurial family. Bill is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and served in executive and/or leadership positions at Thomson Industries, Inc., Dow Corning, Loctite and Sherwin-Williams. He is currently CIO of Pauwels Private Investment Practice. He's been commenting on matters political/economic/philosophical since 1980. View all articles by William Pauwels

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