New York Times Is Confused About Jesus’ Ethnicity (Spoiler Alert: He’s Jewish)

Written by Wes Walker on April 23, 2019

And this nonsense was published on Good Friday, no less.

There was a time when ‘was Christ Jewish’ was a snarky rhetorical answer given to an obvious ‘yes’ question, like asking if water was wet.

Between then and now, has political correctness really made us this ignorant?

Eric Copage, who is black, wrote, “As I grew older, I learned that the fair-skinned, blue-eyed depiction of Jesus has for centuries adorned stained glass windows and altars in churches throughout the United States and Europe. But Jesus, born in Bethlehem, was most likely a Palestinian man with dark skin.” In the 600-plus words of Copage’s piece, he never acknowledges that Jesus was Jewish, which is obvious from every text of the Bible; instead, neatly aligning his perspective with the New York Times penchant consistently siding with Palestinian Arabs in disputes with Israel, he only resorts to calling Jesus a Palestinian.

Copage opined, “Now, even though cultures across the world may at times show a Jesus that reflects their own story, a white Jesus is still deeply embedded in the Western story of Christianity. It has become often impossible to separate Jesus and white from the American psyche. … I am also interested in how white Christians feel about images of Christ. How do you feel about the possibility that Christ may not have looked the way he has been portrayed for centuries in the United States and Europe? If you’ve seen Christ depicted as a man of color, what was your reaction?” [Emphasis added.]
Source: DailyWire

He wasn’t black OR white. He was Jewish.

Do we have to spell it out for ya?

Jesus was Jewish. As in: Son of David. Tribe of Judah. Descended from Abraham, Issac and Jacob. He was circumcised on the 8th day at the Temple in Jerusalem, where his mother and father brought the pauper’s sacrifice as commanded in scripture.

You really have to work hard not to understand that.

We travel the world and mingle with people from all over the place. This wasn’t always the case. A surprising number of people would have lived and died never having traveled more than a day’s ride from the place they were born. That could at least partly explain why Jesus didn’t look especially Jewish in certain artwork.

But today, the blue-eyed blonde-haired ‘surfer Jesus’ is an embarrassing historical artifact that has exactly ZERO bearing on the true faith of actual Christians.

The only people for whom it becomes a big deal are those who have made idols of racial identity, contrary to the explicit instructions of the Apostles themselves.

But speaking of those who make idols of identity, they have a buzzword that defines who is ‘good’ and who is ‘evil’. The word is ‘oppressor’.

Next time you hear someone call Israel ‘Palestine’ ask them if they know the oppressive history of that term?

When Israel was being occupied by a European empire, the Jews dared to revolt against their captors. As punishment, Jerusalem was put to the sword, the Temple torn down, and the city sacked.

A later revolt, under Hadrian, had the (European) emperor determine that the rebellious people be ‘erased’, and the region renamed “Syria Palaestina”.

Doesn’t calling Israel by the derisive name their European Oppressors gave them break all the rules of Intersectional Feminism?

Jewish.

Jesus was Jewish. Would it kill you to say it?

Just like Christians were bombed in Sri Lankan Churches, not ‘Easter Worshipers’.

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