800px-President_Barack_Obama_reflectsJeannie DeAngelis
by Clash Daily Guest Contributor

It seems like eons ago, but following the historic inauguration of Barack Obama, seemingly seconds after the National Mall was swept clean, our new leader and his big-spending cohorts decided it was time to stimulate the economy. Looking back on what now seems to be a hallmark of Obama’s governing style, supposedly for the good of the people, the president immediately stressed the urgency of having to pass a stimulus plan.

At the time, President Obama called together and proceeded to lecture a small group of high-ranking Democrat and Republican leaders from both the House and the Senate and justified the stimulus by saying:

“Look, we are all political animals here, if we don’t do this, we may lose seats. I may not be re-elected. But none of that’s going to matter if we don’t pass this because the economy will be in a crisis and the American people will be hurting.”

Before signing on to the $825 billion plan, besides proposing job-stimulating alternatives, Republicans objected especially to giving tax credits to people who don’t pay taxes. The minority group of Republicans was also troubled by a provision that would allow states to offer Medicaid family planning services, such as contraceptives, which they felt had nothing to do with an economic stimulus. Since then, America has come to realize that Obama’s provisions stimulated something, but it sure wasn’t the economy.

The president responded to all the Republican concerns with a comment he directed toward the then Republican House Minority Whip from Virginia, Eric Cantor, saying, “on some of these issues we’re just going to have ideological differences.” Then he added, “I won. So I think on that one, I trump you.”

It’s four years later and the stimulus package accomplished the very thing Obama predicted would happen had it not passed: “the economy [is] in a crisis and the American people [are] hurting.”

At the time, neither the Republicans nor the rest of the nation realized it, but the president’s “I won” comment summed up what would become Barack Obama’s signature attitude. Obama’s win convinced him that his vision trumps every obstacle and any lawmaker voting on behalf of his or her constituency. One completed term and 153 Executive Orders later, and with more on the way, it appears that in Obama’s mind his vision even trumps the US Constitution.

Thus, for the first two years of his presidency, Barack Obama found ways to get his way. After the 2010 election, when the Republicans won back control of the House, every time his agenda was thwarted what followed were sour-faced denunciations of Republicans and harsh words for the “fat cats” or the oil companies or the whoever. Now, his proposal to expand background checks for gun purchases was just six votes short of the 60 needed to pass – and Obama is having a hissy fit.

If truth be told, Barack Obama has never accepted responsibility for failure. Neither is he a bastion of truth. Therefore his initial reaction was to immediately blame the National Rifle Association (NRA) for lying and to then call the Senate’s 54-46 decision “a pretty shameful day for Washington.”

Barack Obama labeling the day the US Senate decided to protect the Second Amendment shameful, when he openly supports a truly shameful day in 1973 when abortion became legal in the United States, exposed the depths of his own personal and political depravity.

Flanked by the Newtown victims’ families and Gabby Giffords sans Mark ‘AR-15’ Kelly, in the Rose Garden of the White House the president falsely accused the 4.5 million-member National Rifle Association of asserting that his goal was to “create some sort of big-brother gun registry.” The president defiantly maintained that his gun control bill “did the  opposite” and accused the pro-gun lobby of exhibiting a “pattern of spreading untruths,” which he argued, “served a purpose.”