BREAKING: Obama DUMPS 3,853 Regs, 18 Per Every Law Equating A Record 97K Pages Of RED TAPE

A new midnight dump of regulations by Obama will cost Americans BILLIONS.

Barry’s committed to gumming up the works before he leaves office.

In his latest desperate bid for attention, as he is being upstaged by President-Elect Trump at every turn…

everyone-look-at-me

…President Obama is making some late-night proclamations.

A new massive dump of regulations is going to cost Americans Billions of dollars and increase paperwork hours.

President Obama’s lame duck administration poured on thousands more new regulations in 2016 at a rate of 18 for every new law passed, according to a Friday analysis of his team’s expansion of federal authority.

While Congress passed just 211 laws, Obama’s team issued an accompanying 3,852 new federal regulations, some costing billions of dollars.

The 2016 total was the highest annual number of regulations under Obama. Former President Bush issued more in the wake of 9/11.

The proof that it was an overwhelming year for rules and regulations is in the Federal Register, which ended the year Friday by printing a record-setting 97,110 pages, according to the analysis from the Competitive Enterprise Institute.
Read more: Washington Examiner

Do you remember after Hurricane Sandy Obama called for government ‘no bureaucracy, no red tape’?

Obviously, like everyone else in the world, Obama found the red tape problematic.

So why issue more of it?

Is it because Obama:

– hates Trump and his anti-regulation stance?
– loves regulations?
– believes that increased environmental regulation is necessary?
– wants to keep his Progressive ‘street cred’?

Let us know in the comments!

Share if you think that Obama’s new red tape needs to be cut when the Trump Administration takes office.

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