Pocahontas Backfire: Does Warren Have A ‘Trail Of Tears’ Problem In Her Family Tree?

Written by Wes Walker on August 26, 2019

Suddenly that grand plan of wrapping herself in supposed native heritage opened up a huge can of worms. Damning accusations were made — are the allegations true?

Elizabeth Warren who has filled out identification cards with her supposed Native heritage, while submitting plagiarized recipes to ‘Pow Wow Chow’ has been trying to paper over her DNA gaffe by cozying up to various First Nation groups.

Will one oped over the weekend render all of that obvious pandering instantly worthless?

Warren just took a serious hit from the political Left — and from a Native Activist, no less.

Trending: WHOA! Did CNN’s Alisyn Camerota Just Criticize Adam Schiff On The Air? (VIDEO)

A Huffpo OpEd claimed Warren’s ancestors were active participants in the Trail of Tears, and that her direct ancestors had a less-than-stellar relationship the Cherokee people.

In 1836, Warren’s great-great-great-grandfather, a white man named William Marsh, enlisted himself in a Tennessee militia to fight in the “Cherokee War,” an occupation of Cherokee land in the lead-up to the Trail of Tears. Decades later, his grandson John Houston Crawford moved his family onto Indian Territory and squatted on Cherokee land in a move that, with no record of a permit, was almost certainly illegal.

The Crawfords were just some of the tens of thousands of white squatters who outnumber Cherokees on our own land. While Cherokee Nation beseeched Congress to enforce our treaty rights and kick them out, the squatters pushed Congress to divide up our treaty territory and create a path to white land ownership; the squatters won.

The Crawfords settled in the new state of Oklahoma. They lived among Indians, but it wasn’t always peaceful. In 1906, John Crawford shot a Creek man for hitting his son. According to The Boston Globe, his son, Rosco, would later tell stories about how “mean” the Indians were. But one of Crawford’s grandchildren, Pauline Reed, told a very different story. Not a story of living among Indians, a story of being Indian.

Pauline’s youngest child, Elizabeth, grew up with her mother’s version of the story. And though the family had no evidence or relationship to the tribe, Elizabeth Warren never questioned it, she wrote in her memoir. It was her family story, she would say. [emphasis added] — Source: Breitbart

Here are some other Pocahontas gems from the archives:

 

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